Maximising nurses’ and midwives’ response rates to surveys
Evidence & Practice Previous     Next

Maximising nurses’ and midwives’ response rates to surveys

Alannah Louise Cooper Research nurse, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco WA, Australia
Janie Brown Senior lecturer, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, Bentley WA, Australia

Background Low response rates to surveys have been a long-standing issue in research. This includes research involving nurses and midwives. To gain representative samples, appropriate measures to maximise response rates need to be used.

Aim To explore ways to maximise response rates from nurses and midwives, using a hospital-wide survey as an example.

Discussion All nurses and midwives at the study hospital were invited to participate in a survey. To encourage participation and elicit an adequate response rate, several strategies were used. A total of 1,000 surveys were distributed and 319 (32%) were returned. All the required age groups, levels of experience and types of nursing registration were represented in the responses and data saturation was achieved.

Conclusion It is important to pay attention to obtaining a representative sample. Further investigation of response rates to surveys by nurses and midwives is warranted.

Implications for practice Strategies to maximise response rates from a target population should be used when conducting surveys.

Nurse Researcher. 25, 3,31-35. doi: 10.7748/nr.2017.e1494

Correspondence

alannah.cooper@sjog.org.au

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Write for us

For information about writing for RCNi journals, contact writeforus@rcni.com

For author guidelines, go to rcni.com/sites/rcn_nspace/files/Nurse-Researcher-guidelines.pdf

Received: 30 May 2016

Accepted: 02 March 2017