The menopause: symptoms, treatments and implications for women’s health and well-being
Intended for healthcare professionals
CPD    

The menopause: symptoms, treatments and implications for women’s health and well-being

Debra Holloway Nurse consultant, gynaecology, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To increase your awareness of the potential adverse effects of the menopause on women’s health and well-being

  • To enhance your knowledge of the treatments and strategies available to manage menopausal symptoms

  • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

The menopause can manifest through a wide range of signs and symptoms including vasomotor, psychological and genitourinary symptoms. All women undergo the menopause, but not all are affected in the same way or to the same extent. The menopause can be an unsettling and distressing time, affecting women’s well-being, mental health, sexuality, relationships and work. Nurses working in primary care are in a prime position to support women to understand the menopause and offer advice about treatments and lifestyle strategies. The menopause is a midlife event and therefore an opportune time to assess women’s general health and future health needs, investigate and mitigate any risk factors, and diagnose and treat any underlying conditions. This article explores the symptoms and treatments of the menopause and its implications for women’s health and well-being.

Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1759

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@debraholloway20

Correspondence

debra.holloway@gstt.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Holloway D (2022) The menopause: symptoms, treatments and implications for women’s health and well-being. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1759

Published online: 09 February 2022

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