Staff experiences of double-duty caring: at home and at work
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Staff experiences of double-duty caring: at home and at work

Carol Brindley Carer development coordinator, Older People’s Mental Health Service, Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, England

Many healthcare, social care and voluntary agency employees are carers at work and at home, a phenomenon referred to as double-duty caregiving. Using meta-ethnography, this article provides a synthesis of qualitative research by analysing the original words of the interviewees. A linguistic and metaphoric overview provides a deeper, richer picture of the experience of double-duty caring, revealing the sacrifices associated with being a carer at home while employed in a healthcare system, and the paradoxical effects of holding a position in both worlds simultaneously.

Nursing Management. 24, 9, 19-23. doi: 10.7748/nm.2018.e1686

Correspondence

carol.brindley@berkshire.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

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Received: 15 September 2017

Accepted: 05 December 2017

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