Protocol for a block randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve heart failure care
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Protocol for a block randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve heart failure care

Hiba Deek Research associate, Rafic Hariri School of Nursing at the American University of Beirut
Phillip J Newton Chancellor’s post-doctoral research fellow, Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia
Samar Noureddine MSN adult care track coordinator, Rafic Hariri School of Nursing, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
Sally C Inglis Senior research fellow, Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia
Ghina Al Arab Registered nurse, Rafic Hariri School of Nursing, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
Samer Kabbani Director of the cardiology division, Rafik Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon
Wael Chalak Professor of cardiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Beirut, Lebanon
Nadim Timany Chief of cardiology division, Makassed General Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon
Peter S Macdonald Medical director and professor of medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Patricia M Davidson Dean and professor, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore MD, US

Aim To describe the design of a randomised controlled trial conducted to evaluate a culturally tailored, nurse-led educational intervention.

Background Self-care strategies are critical to improving health outcomes in heart failure. The family unit is crucial in collectivist cultures, but little is known about involving the family in the self-care of patients with heart failure.

Discussion Involving the family in the self-care of heart failure is a novel approach. To the authors’ knowledge, no one has evaluated it using a randomised controlled trial.

Conclusion A valid comparison of outcomes between the control group and the intervention group involved in the study was provided in this trial. The chosen design, randomised controlled trial, enabled the assessment of the intervention.

Implications for practice The application of a family self-care intervention in a collectivist culture was shown to improve clinical and quality outcomes of patients with heart failure. Considering the individual and the community needs is vital in improving these outcomes.

Nurse Researcher. 23, 4, 24-29. doi: 10.7748/nr.23.4.24.s6

Correspondence

hiba.deek@gmail.com

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 23 March 2015

Accepted: 09 June 2015

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