Life beyond cancer: exploring the value of end-of-treatment clinics for teenagers and young adults
evidence and practice    

Life beyond cancer: exploring the value of end-of-treatment clinics for teenagers and young adults

Laura Baker Clinical psychologist, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England
Mia Foxhall Clinical psychologist, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England
Jacqueline Hulbert Clinical nurse specialist, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England
Claire Lewis-Norman Clinical nurse specialist, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England
Elizabeth Allison Clinical nurse specialist, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England
Rachel Irwin Clinical psychologist, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To recognise the needs of teenagers and young people at the end of their cancer treatment

  • To learn about a clinic model that was developed to ease patients’ transition from active cancer treatment to increasing self-management

  • To understand the potential benefits of end-of-treatment clinics and how these findings could be used to inform your practice

Supporting the needs of teenagers and young adults (TYAs) following cancer treatment is vital, particularly during the transition between active treatment and increasing self-management. The period immediately after the end of treatment is a critical time for TYAs and their families, who often require information about the need for continued screening and surveillance, as well as healthy lifestyle behaviours. This article describes the development of a pilot end-of-treatment clinic for TYAs, and reports on the findings of a service evaluation that was undertaken to determine the value of this model. The aim of the clinic was to ease patients’ transition into self-management and to improve their long-term physical and psychological outcomes. The findings from the service evaluation indicate that the clinic model is effective in meeting TYA patients’ needs and supporting their self-management.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2021.e1751

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

laura.baker2@uhbw.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Baker L, Foxhall M, Hulbert J et al (2021) Life beyond cancer: exploring the value of end-of-treatment clinics for teenagers and young adults. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2021.e1751

Published online: 22 June 2021

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