Development of the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings across England
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Development of the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings across England

Steve Robertson Programme director, RCN Research Alliance, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Rachel King Research associate, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Beth Taylor Research associate, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Sara Laker Associate professor, College of Nursing and Health Science, Winona State University, Winona, Minnesota, US
Emily Wood Research fellow, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Michaela Senek Research associate, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Angela Tod Professor, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England
Tony Ryan Professor, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand some of the benefits that the nursing associate role can bring to community and primary care nursing teams

  • To be aware of the challenges involved in training and embedding nursing associates in community and primary care settings

  • To recognise the need for clarity on the boundaries and expectations of the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings

Nursing associates have been part of the health and social care workforce in England since 2017 and are starting to contribute to managing workforce challenges. However, little is known about the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings. This article provides an overview of what is known about the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings and introduces some emerging findings from recent research. The article identifies some of the benefits that nursing associates can bring to community and primary care nursing teams and some of the challenges involved in training and embedding nursing associates in these sectors of the health and social care workforce.

Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1764

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@NursingSra

Correspondence

s.robertson@sheffield.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Robertson S, King R, Taylor B et al (2022) Development of the nursing associate role in community and primary care settings across England. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1764

Acknowledgement

The project was funded by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) as part of the Strategic Research Alliance between the RCN and the University of Sheffield. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the RCN or the University of Sheffield.

Published online: 13 April 2022

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