Effect of simulated learning on blood pressure measurement skills
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Effect of simulated learning on blood pressure measurement skills

Gill Ballard Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Peterborough
Stewart Piper Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Peterborough
Peter Stokes Subject librarian, Faculty of Health and Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Peterborough

Aim To explore whether additional teaching and simulated learning of one-hour duration could improve the blood pressure measurement skills of nursing students.

Method A post-test experimental method was used to measure the outcome of additional, targeted simulated learning of blood pressure monitoring beyond normal curriculum content in adult branch nursing students in module one of a three-year nursing programme.

Results One hour of additional teaching and simulated learning improved the ability of nursing students to measure blood pressure accurately, with the data revealing a statistical difference between experimental and control groups in the systolic and diastolic accuracy of blood pressure monitoring.

Conclusion In a changing practice environment with fewer opportunities to develop clinical skills under supervision, there is a need for nurse educators and mentors to reconsider and research further methods used for blood pressure monitoring and other skills teaching using simulation for effective learning and skills acquisition.

Nursing Standard. 27, 8,43-47. doi: 10.7748/ns2012.10.27.8.43.c9363

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

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