Identifying incontinence and promoting continence in people living with dementia
Intended for healthcare professionals
CPD    

Identifying incontinence and promoting continence in people living with dementia

Zena Aldridge Independent dementia nurse consultant, Norfolk, England
Laura Elsegood Nurse and clinical consultant, Essity UK, Dunstable, England
Sarah Murray Nurse and clinical consultant, Essity UK, Dunstable, England
Alison Wileman Nurse and strategic healthcare partner continence, Essity UK, Dunstable, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand the causes and risk factors for incontinence in people living with dementia

  • To learn about practical strategies that can support people living with dementia and their family carers to manage incontinence

  • To contribute towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

Urinary and faecal incontinence are more prevalent among older people but, like dementia, incontinence is not a normal or inevitable part of ageing. The number of people living with dementia who experience continence issues is likely to be underestimated because many people avoid reporting them as a result of embarrassment and stigma, or because they think incontinence is an inevitable symptom of dementia and that nothing can be done about it. Increased awareness and understanding of the relationship between dementia and incontinence is needed so that nurses can persuade people living with dementia and their family carers to discuss continence issues, assess their needs and provide support. There are several practical strategies that can reduce the incidence of incontinence, counter its negative effects and promote continence in people living with dementia.

Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2023.e1451

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@ZenaAldridge1

Correspondence

zenaaldridge@hotmail.co.uk

Conflict of interest

Zena Aldridge is consultant editor of Nursing Older People. Laura Elsegood, Sarah Murray and Alison Wileman work for Essity, a company that sells personal care and continence products. Zena Aldridge undertakes some work with Essity in her capacity as independent dementia nurse consultant but did not receive any payment for this article

Aldridge Z, Elsegood L, Murray S et al (2023) Identifying incontinence and promoting continence in people living with dementia. Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2023.e1451

Published online: 22 November 2023

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