Perceptions of leadership among final-year undergraduate nursing students
Evidence & Practice    

Perceptions of leadership among final-year undergraduate nursing students

Jayne Francis-Shama Senior lecturer, Faculty of Society and Health, Buckinghamshire New University, Uxbridge
Aim

The promotion of a distributed leadership model in health care means there is an expectation that undergraduate training should contribute to the development of nursing students' leadership capabilities. However, there is concern that the nursing degree programme is not sufficiently preparing students. This study explored nursing students' perceptions of leadership before qualifying, and how prepared they felt to take on leadership roles.

Method

Data were collected from 20 undergraduate nursing students, using a Straussian grounded theory approach, through three focus groups and six semi-structured interviews.

Findings

These suggest students are disengaged from the learning of leadership, and preparation for leadership in clinical areas is problematic, as students are exposed to flawed role modelling.

Conclusion

Discrepancies between nurse education and the realities of clinical practice mean that successfully preparing nursing students for leadership roles will be challenging within current provision.

Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2016.e1535

Correspondence

jayne.francis-shama@bucks.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Received: 23 May 2016

Accepted: 09 August 2016

Published online: 15 October 2016