Nurse practitioners changing health behaviours: one patient at a time
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Nurse practitioners changing health behaviours: one patient at a time

Esther Sangster-Gormley Associate professor, School of nursing at the University of Victoria, British Columbia
Janessa Griffith Research assistant, School of health information science at the University of Victoria, British Columbia
Rita Schreiber Professor, School of nursing at the University of Victoria, British Columbia
April Feddema Project co-ordinator, School of nursing at the University of Victoria, British Columbia
Elizabeth Boryki Associate professor, School of health information science at the University of Victoria, British Columbia
Joanne Thompson Research assistant, School of nursing at the University of Victoria, British Columbia

Esther Sangster-Gormley and colleagues describe healthcare services in British Columbia, Canada, one decade after the nurse practitioner role was implemented there

In 2005, legislation was enacted allowing nurse practitioners (NPs) to practise in British Columbia, Canada. Although substantial human and financial resources had been dedicated to the implementation of the role, no evaluation has been conducted to date. As part of a larger multiphase, mixed-methods study design, which evaluated the integration of NPs into the British Columbia healthcare system, this article describes findings related to changes that result for patients and the implications for the healthcare system when NPs become part of the care process. Using survey and interview data, themes that emerged were patient satisfaction, access to care, and behavioural changes. Findings suggest that patients are satisfied with the care they receive from NPs and that NPs make positive changes to health behaviour.

Nursing Management. 22, 6,26-31. doi: 10.7748/nm.22.6.26.e1404

Correspondence

egorm@uvic.ca

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

This work was supported by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, Vancouver, British Columbia (grant number PJ-HHR-00004 (10-1).

Received: 22 June 2015

Accepted: 18 August 2015