Parent-child relationships and self‑control in male university students’ desire to play video games
evidence and practice    

Parent-child relationships and self‑control in male university students’ desire to play video games

Sina Karbasizadeh Clinical psychologist, Clinical Psychology Department, Isfahan University, Iran
Masih Jani Researcher, Psychology Department, Isfahan University, Iran
Mahtab Keshvari Researcher, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Aim To determine the relationship between the parent-child relationship, self-control and demographic characteristics and the desire to play video games among male university students at one university in Iran.

Method This was a correlational, descriptive, applied study. A total of 103 male students were selected randomly as a study sample from the population of male students at Isfahan University in Iran. Data collection tools used were the Video Games Questionnaire, Tanji’s Self-Control Scale, Parent-Child Relationship Questionnaire, and Demographic Questionnaire. Data were analysed using stepwise regression analysis.

Results This study found several factors increased male students’ desire to play video games. Demographic characteristics associated with increased tendency to play video games among male students in Iran are older age, larger number of family members, lower parental level of education and higher socio-economic class, while other significant factors are a lower level of self‑control and a poorer parent-child relationship.

Participants’ higher socio-economic class, lower level of self-control and older age explained 8.2%, 5.2% and 5.9% of their desire to play video games, respectively. These three variables together accounted for significantly 16.9% of a male student’s desire to play video games in this study (P<0.05).

Conclusion These results suggest that the family’s socio-economic status plays a significant role in young men’s desire to play video games in Iran. Moreover, lower levels of self-control and a poorer parent-child relationship were found to be accompanied by a greater desire to play video games among male university students.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e891

Citation

Karbasizadeh S, Jani M, Keshvari M (2018) Parent-child relationships and self-control in male university students’ desire to play video games. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e891

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

sinakarbasi14@gmail.com

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 12 June 2018

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