Using de-escalation strategies to prevent aggressive behaviour
Evidence & Practice Previous     Next

Using de-escalation strategies to prevent aggressive behaviour

Anne Ines Brewer Psychological well-being practitioner/student alumna, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Keele University, Staffordshire, England
Roger Beech Reader in research development, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Keele University, Staffordshire, England
Sinikiwe Simbani Lecturer in mental health nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Keele University, Staffordshire, England

Reducing the use of physical restraint in clinical practice, including face-down restraint, is a challenge for professionals. The aim of this literature review was to assess the use of de-escalation techniques to prevent aggressive behaviour or decrease its intensity. A systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken for articles published between 2000 and 2015. Evidence was found for the use of physical and pharmacological interventions to de-escalate aggressive behaviour; limited to no evidence was found to support the use of verbal de-escalation techniques in similar clinical settings. Research is needed to identify evidence-based strategies for the prevention and de-escalation of aggressive behaviour without using restraint.

Correspondence inesbrewer@hotmail.com

Mental Health Practice. 21, 2,22-28. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2017.e1221

Received: 18 October 2016

Accepted: 06 March 2017

Published in print: 11 October 2017

Conflict Of Interest

None declared

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software