Improving the perceived quality of life of US military veterans with serious mental illness
evidence and practice    

Improving the perceived quality of life of US military veterans with serious mental illness

Sheila Alexander Certified registered nurse practitioner, VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, Tennessee, US
Stephanie Wynn Professor, Samford University, Ida V Moffett School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, US

As the economics of providing healthcare are constantly explored, new models of care must be implemented with patients who have serious mental illness (SMI) in the hope of reducing taxpayers’ burden. An evidence-based intervention (health coaching) was evaluated for its benefits in improving the perceived quality of life of military veterans with SMI. Participants completed a health questionnaire and self-assessment survey. Following 12 health coaching sessions, the participants completed the survey again. An evaluation of individualised goals was completed. Pre- and post-associations of the questions from the survey were analysed. On average, the participants (n=8) reported a more favourable health state in most domains and 88% of the veterans were satisfied with using health coaching as a method to improve quality of life. Health coaching provides the tools for influencing aspirations, goals and interactions with others, enhancing the possibility of better health outcomes. The approach improves the perceived quality of life of veterans with SMI.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1298

Citation

Alexander S, Wynn S (2018) Improving the perceived quality of life of US military veterans with serious mental illness. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1298

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

swynn@samford.edu

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 31 May 2018

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