Developing cultural competence in addiction services: the role of clinical leadership
evidence and practice    

Developing cultural competence in addiction services: the role of clinical leadership

Owain Ashworth Clinical team leader, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England

Community addiction services must offer treatment to all members of the community, even hard-to-reach groups, such as those from ethnic communities, who are often underrepresented in these services. The commissioning cycle and a reduction in resources has affected how services engage these patients.

This article explores how cultural competence and the clinical leadership role can support innovations that welcome hard-to-reach patients. Small-scale innovations, such as the translation of service leaflets, could improve accessibility to addiction services for these patients and provide a template for future initiatives with other hard-to-reach groups.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2019.e1276

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

owain.ashworth@slam.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Ashworth O (2019) Developing cultural competence in addiction services: the role of clinical leadership. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2019.e1276

Published online: 07 March 2019

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
RCN student member? Try Nursing Standard Student
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or