Restrictive interventions: understanding and reducing their use in mental health settings
Intended for healthcare professionals
CPD    

Restrictive interventions: understanding and reducing their use in mental health settings

Nutmeg Hallett Lecturer in mental health nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England
Paul McLaughlin Lead nurse, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your awareness of the ethical issues and legal frameworks associated with the use of restrictive interventions

  • To read about strategies that have been implemented to reduce the use of restrictive interventions

  • To contribute towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

Restrictive interventions, which include enhanced observations, seclusion and restraint, are associated with significant and far-reaching harm for patients, staff and those who witness their use. They should only ever be used as the last resort. However, mental health professionals often encounter patient behaviours that challenge, which can include violence, which may prompt them to use restrictive interventions. The primary prevention of patient behaviours that challenge is crucial to reduce the need for restrictive interventions in mental health settings.

This article discusses the different types of restrictive interventions and describes some strategies that can support reduction of their use in mental health settings. The authors also consider some of the legal and ethical aspects of restrictive interventions and identify the importance of adopting a trauma-informed approach to care.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2022.e1620

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@dr_nutmeg

Correspondence

n.n.hallett@bham.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Hallett N, McLaughlin P (2022) Restrictive interventions: understanding and reducing their use in mental health settings. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2022.e1620

Published online: 23 August 2022

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