Increasing the effectiveness of staff training in services for people with learning disabilities with behaviour that challenges
evidence and practice    

Increasing the effectiveness of staff training in services for people with learning disabilities with behaviour that challenges

James Breeze Assistant psychologist, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, intensive support team, Moorgreen Hospital, Southampton, England
Matt Symes Consultant clinical psychologist, learning disabilities division, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, England

Positive behaviour support (PBS) is considered best practice in managing behaviour that challenges in learning disability care. However, training staff to implement PBS approaches has rarely been shown to have lasting effects on consistent delivery of support plans.

This article discusses how PBS training can be designed to ensure retention of knowledge and skills, and to improve implementation of these plans – a significant problem highlighted in recent research. The conclusions drawn from this article support an interactive and collaborative training format in which direct support staff are actively involved with the design, implementation and monitoring of PBS plans. This can be neatly summarised by the Chinese proverb ‘Tell me, I will forget. Show me, I may remember. But involve me, and I will understand’.

Learning Disability Practice. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2019.e1987

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

james.breeze1@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

None declared

Breeze J, Symes M (2019) Increasing the effectiveness of staff training in services for people with learning disabilities with behaviour that challenges. Learning Disability Practice. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2019.e1987

Published online: 29 July 2019