Comparing the hair apposition technique with traditional closure in scalp lacerations: a literature review
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Comparing the hair apposition technique with traditional closure in scalp lacerations: a literature review

Michelle Neary-Zajiczek Senior sister, Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To identify the clinical outcomes for patients with scalp lacerations using the hair apposition technique (HAT) in comparison to the traditional options for wound closure in the emergency department

  • To recognise that further research is required to support the existing evidence on the use of HAT for scalp lacerations

  • To be aware that emergency nurses must undertake appropriate education and clinical skills practice before implementation of HAT in their setting

This literature review aimed to explore the clinical outcomes for adult and child patients with scalp lacerations using the hair apposition technique (HAT) compared with the traditional options of sutures and staples for wound closure in the emergency department (ED). Although the research is scant, in the studies examined HAT was received positively by patients, had limited complications, was cost-effective and was suitable for use in the age ranges that met the criteria for its application. Further research is required to support the existing evidence, but the use of HAT for low-risk scalp lacerations in the ED should be considered and is within the scope of all healthcare professionals who undertake appropriate practice of this clinical skill.

Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2022.e2144

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

michelle_neary1@yahoo.ie

Conflict of interest

None declared

Neary-Zajiczek M (2022) Comparing the hair apposition technique with traditional closure in scalp lacerations: a literature review. Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2022.e2144

Published online: 20 September 2022

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