Black African and black Caribbean men’s understanding and experiences of prostate cancer post-treatment in England: a qualitative study
evidence and practice    

Black African and black Caribbean men’s understanding and experiences of prostate cancer post-treatment in England: a qualitative study

Obrey Alexis Senior Lecturer, Oxford Brookes University, Swindon, Wiltshire, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To gain knowledge of black men’s understanding and experience of prostate cancer

  • To understand that black men require knowledge and information about prostate cancer

  • To gain insight into the views and experiences of black African and black Caribbean men

Aim Black African and black Caribbean men are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer compared with white men, and some appear to have little knowledge of the disease. The aim of this study was to examine black African and black Caribbean men’s understanding and experience of prostate cancer post-treatment and to create a video to raise awareness in the African and Caribbean communities of the importance of testing.

Method In total 20 black African and black Caribbean men were interviewed using a qualitative approach and the data were analysed thematically.

Findings There was a lack of knowledge and understanding of prostate cancer among the study sample, who were also sometimes exposed to misinformation within the black community, including herbal remedies. Some participants believed their racial features were a barrier to the way in which limited information was shared with them by healthcare professionals.

Conclusion There is a need to raise awareness about prostate cancer in black communities to educate men about the disease and its effects. Additionally, evidence-based information about the disease is required to educate black men and to reduce the effects of misinformation and herbal remedies on their well-being. In the health sector, unconscious bias should be recognised, addressed and avoided to ensure inclusive and person-centred care regardless of ethnicity.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2020.e1732

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

oalexis@brookes.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Alexis O (2020) Black African and black Caribbean men’s understanding and experience of prostate cancer post-treatment in England: a qualitative study. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2020.e1732

Published online: 20 August 2020

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