Examining the theoretical basis of quality of life interventions in the congenital heart disease population
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Examining the theoretical basis of quality of life interventions in the congenital heart disease population

Suzanne Fredericks Associate professor, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada
Jennifer Lapum Associate professor, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada

Arrhythmias have long been perceived as resulting in decreased quality of life. However, recent studies have refuted this perception, with evidence suggesting people with congenital heart disease – who are those most prone to arrhythmias – can have a comparable or better quality of life than their healthy peers. There is a need for organisations to review the theoretical foundations of interventions and to ensure their nursing staff have adequate knowledge to implement these interventions effectively. Disability paradox, response shift and sense of coherence are the theoretical bases of interventions designed to enhance the perception of quality of life. Such interventions include virtual gaming, psychosocial interventions and cognitive behaviour therapies.

Primary Health Care. 27, 10,30-33. doi: 10.7748/phc.2017.e1317

Correspondence

j.lapum@ryerson.ca

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

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Received: 23 May 2017

Accepted: 28 June 2017