Toxoplasmosis prevention: knowledge and practices among pregnant women in Jordan
evidence and practice    

Toxoplasmosis prevention: knowledge and practices among pregnant women in Jordan

Mohammad Suliman Associate professor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Kholoud Assmairan Clinical instructor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Hind Al sheikh Clinical instructor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Maen Aljezawi Associate professor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Hanan Abu Musameh Clinical instructor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Salwa Abu Alrob Clinical instructor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Mohammed ALBashtawy Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan

Why you should read this article:
  • To refresh your knowledge about routes of infection and risk factors in toxoplasmosis

  • To learn about toxoplasmosis knowledge and practices among pregnant women in Jordan

  • To understand the preventive practices required from pregnant women to avoid toxoplasmosis

Background Toxoplasmosis is a common zoonotic infection which, in pregnant women, can result in miscarriage, stillbirth or child disability. Prevention and education play a crucial role in reducing the risks of infection and complications.

Aim To assess the knowledge and practices of pregnant women in Jordan in relation to toxoplasmosis and its prevention.

Method A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in a convenience sample of 583 pregnant women visiting a health centre, hospital or private gynaecology clinic in the Jordanian governorate of Mafraq. The governorate has the second-largest population of Syrian refugees in Jordan. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ knowledge and practices.

Results Of the 583 participants, 75% had never heard of toxoplasmosis. Participants demonstrated, to varying degrees, some adequate knowledge of toxoplasmosis prevention and some adequate use of preventive practices. None of the sociodemographic characteristics of participants was predictive of their level of knowledge of toxoplasmosis, except nationality: Syrian women had a statistically significant lower level of knowledge than Jordanian women.

Conclusion There are gaps in knowledge and practices among pregnant women in Jordan in relation to toxoplasmosis and its prevention. Improved health education, particularly for female Syrian refugees living in Jordan, could enhance knowledge and practices, thereby reducing the risks of infection and complications.

Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2021.e1702

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

mbarahemah@aabu.edu.jo

Conflict of interest

None declared

Suliman M, Assmairan K, Al sheikh H et al (2021) Toxoplasmosis prevention: knowledge and practices among pregnant women in Jordan. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2021.e1702

Published online: 05 May 2021

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