Understanding reflective practice
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Understanding reflective practice

Jacqueline Sian Nicol Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland.
Isabel Dosser Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires that nurses and midwives use feedback as an opportunity for reflection and learning, to improve practice. The NMC revalidation process stipulates that practitioners provide examples of how they have achieved this. To reflect in a meaningful way, it is important to understand what is meant by reflection, the skills required, and how reflection can be undertaken successfully. Traditionally, reflection occurs after an event encountered in practice. The authors challenge this perception, suggesting that reflection should be undertaken before, during and after an event. This article provides practical guidance to help practitioners use reflective models to write reflective accounts. It also outlines how the reflective process can be used as a valuable learning tool in preparation for revalidation.

Nursing Standard. 30, 36, 34-42. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.36.34.s44

Correspondence

j.nicol@napier.ac.uk

Peer review

All articles are subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software.

Received: 28 September 2015

Accepted: 09 January 2016

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