Recognising and responding to care erosion: part 2
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Recognising and responding to care erosion: part 2

Jan Martinus Anne de Vries Assistant professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
Fiona Timmins Associate professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

This article is the second in a two-part series discussing a gradual decline in standards of care, termed ‘care erosion’. The first part of this article used cognitive dissonance theory to discuss the psychosocial mechanisms involved in care erosion and focused on the nurse's role in identifying and preventing declining standards in care. This article, part two, explores the wider involvement of individuals, organisations and nurse education in preventing care erosion, with a particular focus on reflection; mastery of nursing skills and care; supporting nursing values; and addressing denial and trivialisation of, and justifications for, substandard care.

Nursing Standard. 31, 52, 44-51. doi: 10.7748/ns.2017.e10821

Correspondence

devriej@tcd.ie

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 26 January 2017

Accepted: 28 March 2017

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