Overactive bladder in women
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Overactive bladder in women

Julie C Jenks Advanced nurse practitioner, Urology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, England

Overactive bladder in women is a common chronic condition of urinary storage, affecting a significant proportion of the population. It is defined as a symptom diagnosis that indicates lower urinary tract dysfunction, in which patients experience urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency and nocturia. The diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder are straightforward and systematic in line with national and international guidelines. However, women are required to disclose their bladder symptoms, and be motivated to make changes to their lifestyle to see improvements. This article focuses specifically on idiopathic detrusor overactivity; its diagnosis, treatment and psychological effects on women. Healthcare professionals require an understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment rationale for the condition to ensure appropriate management strategies for patients presenting to primary and secondary care are implemented.

Nursing Standard. 31, 9, 52-63. doi: 10.7748/ns.2016.e10167

Correspondence

Julie.jenks@uclh.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

The author undertakes consulting duties as a member of the Medtronic Bladder and Bowel Nurse Advisory Board for sacral neuromodulation therapy in the UK

Received: 01 June 2015

Accepted: 28 July 2016

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