Infection risks associated with needleless intravenous access devices
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Infection risks associated with needleless intravenous access devices

Anna L Casey Clinical research scientist, Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham
Tom SJ Elliott Consultant microbiologist and deputy medical director, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham

Needleless intravenous (IV) access devices were initially introduced into clinical practice to reduce the rate of IV catheter-related needlestick injuries. Their efficacy for this purpose has been confirmed in subsequent reports. However, since their introduction approximately 15 years ago there have been conflicting reports about the risk of IV catheter-related bloodstream infection. This article reviews the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection associated with needleless IV access devices and outlines the types of needleless IV access devices available.

Nursing Standard. 22, 11,38-44. doi: 10.7748/ns2007.11.22.11.38.c6240

Correspondence

anna.casey@uhb.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review