Implications of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 on advance care planning at the end of life
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Implications of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 on advance care planning at the end of life

Julie Foster Preferred place of care co-ordinator, Lancashire and South Cumbria Cancer Network, Preston
Mary Turner Preferred place of care project manager, Lancashire and South Cumbria Cancer Network, Preston

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 is concerned with decisions that are made on behalf of adults who lack the capacity to make those decisions for themselves. It has profound implications for decision making in end-of-life care. This article explores some of the issues raised by this legislation and highlights the need for health and social care professionals who are engaged in providing end-of-life care to understand their legal duty in relation to the act.

Correspondence julie.foster@lsccn.nhs.uk

Nursing Standard. 22, 2,35-39. doi: 10.7748/ns2007.09.22.2.35.c4615

Published in print: 19 September 2007

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review