COVID-19 and sepsis: what do the similarities mean for nurses and patients?
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COVID-19 and sepsis: what do the similarities mean for nurses and patients?

Jennifer Trueland Health journalist

As with sepsis, for many people the after-effects of COVID-19 will require long-term support

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was expected that patients who reached intensive care would need help to breathe, hence the rush to procure ventilators. In the event, however, many needed a lot more than that. A significant percentage had heart problems, required haemodialysis to keep their kidneys working, and developed devastating blood clots and multi-organ failure.

Nursing Standard. 35, 10, 54-56. doi: 10.7748/ns.35.10.54.s19

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