Implementing laughter therapy to enhance the well-being of patients and nurses
evidence and practice    

Implementing laughter therapy to enhance the well-being of patients and nurses

Penny Tremayne Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester, England
Kirti Sharma Laughter therapist, Body Mind Laughter, Leicester, England

Why you should read this article:
  • » To understand the role of complementary and alternative medicine in supporting patients’ and nurses’ health and well-being

  • » To recognise the physical and psychosocial benefits of laughter therapy for patients and nurses

  • » To consider how you might implement laughter therapy in your practice for patients, or how you might engage with the activity yourself

Most people enjoy laughing and having fun, and this can enable individuals to socialise and bond. However, there is a difference between spontaneous laughter and laughter therapy, which consists of physical exercise, relaxation techniques and simulated vigorous laughter. This article aims to enhance nurses’ knowledge and understanding of laughter therapy, which is a practice within complementary and alternative medicine. It discusses the evolution of laughter therapy, and describes its components and how it is practised. This article also identifies the physical and psychosocial benefits of laughter therapy, and how patients and nurses can engage with this activity to enhance their well-being.

Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11064

Citation

Tremayne P, Sharma K (2019) Implementing laughter therapy to enhance the well-being of patients and nurses. Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11064

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

ptremay@dmu.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 11 February 2019

You need a subscription to read the full article