Acute kidney injury in the critical care setting
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Acute kidney injury in the critical care setting

Natasha Price Lecturer, division of nursing and paramedic science, school of health sciences, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland
Alison Fiona Wood Lecturer, programme lead for independent prescribing, division of nursing and paramedic science, school of health sciences, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scotland

Why you should read this article:
  • To refresh your knowledge of the signs and symptoms of acute kidney injury

  • To familiarise yourself with the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury and associated complications

  • To understand the management of the patient with acute kidney injury in the critical care setting, including haemodynamic support and continuous renal replacement therapy

Acute kidney injury is a sudden reduction in renal function which impairs the kidneys’ ability to maintain fluid, electrolyte and acid-base balance. The syndrome often develops secondary to severe illness and is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality rate in critically ill patients. This article gives an overview of the pathophysiology and aetiology of acute kidney injury, as well as the associated complications and clinical diagnostic signs. The authors also describe some common causes of the syndrome in critically ill patients, specifically sepsis, liver failure and cardiac failure, and discuss patient management in the critical care setting, with a focus on haemodynamic support and continuous renal replacement therapy.

Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2023.e12063

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@alisonwood_PhD

Correspondence

AWood1@qmu.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Price N, Wood AF (2023) Acute kidney injury in the critical care setting. Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2023.e12063

Published online: 17 July 2023

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