Differentiating between dementia, delirium and depression in older people
CPD    

Differentiating between dementia, delirium and depression in older people

Karen Harrison Dening Head of research and publications, Dementia UK, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your knowledge of the features of dementia, delirium and depression

  • To understand how to differentiate between dementia, delirium and depression, and the validated clinical assessment tools available to assist in this

  • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

Older people can find hospital stays challenging and distressing. When their presenting symptoms make it challenging for healthcare professionals to differentiate between dementia, delirium and depression, their experience may be increasingly distressing, and can result in delays in diagnosis and treatment, as well as an increased risk of morbidity. This article considers each of the conditions of dementia, delirium and depression, their presenting features and how nurses can differentiate between them to enable comprehensive assessment, diagnosis and treatment in older people.

Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11361

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

Karen.harrison-dening@dementiauk.org

Conflict of interest

None declared

Harrison Dening K (2019) Differentiating between dementia, delirium and depression in older people. Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11361

Published online: 25 November 2019