Organic versus mixed specialist older adult inpatient mental health units for people with dementia
Evidence and practice    

Organic versus mixed specialist older adult inpatient mental health units for people with dementia

Mohan Rajendra Gondhalekar Consultant psychiatrist, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, Romford, England
Azza Bakkar Resident doctor, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, US
Robert Chaplin Consultant psychiatrist and research fellow, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, England
Eleanor Parker Quality assurance manager, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Robert Low Project officer, Royal College of Psychiatrists, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand the challenges of providing inpatient care for people with dementia

  • To familiarise yourself with the differences between organic inpatient wards and mixed inpatient wards

  • To learn about the optimal inpatient environment for people with dementia

Dementia presents a major public health challenge to healthcare providers globally. When older people with dementia need inpatient mental healthcare, they can be cared for in one of two different types of older adult ward. These patients can either be admitted to an organic inpatient ward for people with dementia or the subtypes of dementia, or they can be admitted to a mixed inpatient ward for older people who have either functional or organic conditions.

Using a quality assurance pilot study, the authors aimed to investigate whether the quality of care for patients with dementia differed between mixed and organic inpatient wards in units exclusively serving older people. The quality of care on both types of ward was compared by analysing observed interactions between patients and staff, patient well-being and patient environment and mealtimes. The quality of care was measured with a specially developed instrument and against evidence-based standards of care. The ratings of both types of ward showed high levels of quality interactions between patients and staff. There were minimal differences in the quality of patient and staff interactions, patient well-being, and patient environment and mealtimes between the two types of ward. Further work on outcomes and carer experiences needs to be undertaken to establish the optimal care environment for people with dementia.

Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2021.e1353

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@MohanGondhalek2

Correspondence

mohan.gondhalekar@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

Robert Chaplin and Robert Low are employed by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which is the organisation that administers the Quality Network for Older Adults Mental Health Services

Gondhalekar MR, Bakkar A, Chaplin R et al (2021) Organic versus mixed specialist older adult inpatient mental health units for people with dementia. Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2021.e1353

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to acknowledge the help and support of the individual wards who participated in the accreditation review process run by the Quality Network for Older Adults’ Mental Health Services

Published online: 22 September 2021

Want to read more?

Already subscribed? Log in

OR

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first 3 months

Your subscription package includes:
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals and their archives
  • Customisable dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests
Subscribe
RCN student member? Try Nursing Standard Student

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or