Cognitive decline: can diet be a preventive or treatment option?
evidence and practice    

Cognitive decline: can diet be a preventive or treatment option?

Robert Davies Assistant lecturer in dietetics, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, England

Cognitive decline has been associated with and accepted as a consequence of ageing. Diets such as the Mediterranean diet have been investigated for their effect on abating cognitive decline. However, diet is not the only aspect of the Mediterranean life that may play a role – social interaction and cultural engagement may also be influential in preserving cognitive function through the ageing process.

This article discusses the perspective on cognitive decline and the influence the Mediterranean diet may have. It highlights that no sole dietary regimen will prevent cognitive decline and the UK healthy eating guidelines reflect those foods included in the Mediterranean diet. The focus should instead be on the way in which people engage with food, society and culture to maintain a healthy body and mind.

Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1145

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

ac9606@coventry.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Davies R (2019) Cognitive decline: can diet be a preventive or treatment option? Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1145

Published online: 13 March 2019