Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover
evidence and practice    

Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover

Mohammad Suliman Associate Professor, chairman of Community and Mental Health Department, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Mean Aljezawi Associate Professor, Community and Mental Health Department, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Shaheerha Almansi Teacher, Community and Mental Health Department, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Ahmad Musa Associate Professor, Adult Health Department, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Manar Alazam Associate Professor, Community and Mental Health Department, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Wafa’a F Ta’an Assistant Professor, Department of Community and Mental Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan

Why you should read this article
  • To be aware of the proportion of nurses who intend to leave their current job

  • To recognise the nurse characteristics that can affect nurse turnover

  • To understand the factors that should be considered to improve nurse recruitment and retention

Background Nurse turnover is a prevalent and serious issue in Jordan, with many nurses leaving their jobs to search for better opportunities outside the country. It is therefore important to assess anticipated nurse turnover and the factors that may affect this, to prevent the costly and unnecessary loss of staff.

Aim To assess anticipated nurse turnover and its predictors, and to compare these between public and university-affiliated (teaching) hospitals.

Method A descriptive, cross-sectional and comparative design was used. Anticipated nurse turnover was measured using the Anticipated Turnover Scale, which consists of 12 items related to a nurse’s intention to leave their job that are rated using a seven-point Likert-scale. Questionnaires were distributed to 280 nurses from three public hospitals and one university-affiliated hospital in the north of Jordan. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression and independent t-tests.

Results Questionnaire responses were received from 250 nurses, yielding a response rate of 89%. This study identified that 68% of respondents intended to leave their job. Being older, more experienced and with a higher level of education increased the likelihood of nurse turnover. Nurses working in the university-affiliated hospital had a higher intent to leave compared with those working in public hospitals.

Conclusion This study found that a high proportion of nurses working in hospitals in the north of Jordan were considering leaving their jobs, and nurses’ characteristics had a significant role in determining anticipated turnover. The results of this study could provide policymakers and stakeholders in Jordan with guidance to develop policies and retention programmes that could improve nurses’ work environment and reduce turnover.

Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2020.e1956

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

mbarahemah@aabu.edu.jo

Conflict of interest

None declared

Suliman M, Aljezawi M, Almansi S et al (2020) Identifying the nurse characteristics that affect anticipated turnover. Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2020.e1956

Published online: 10 December 2020

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