Effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover
evidence and practice    

Effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover

Mohammad Suliman Associate professor, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Shaheerha Almansi Master of Science in Nursing clinical instructor, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Majd Mrayyan Professor, The Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan
Mohammed ALBashtawy Professor, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Mean Aljezawi Associate professor, Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan

Why you should read this article:
  • To recognise the factors that can affect nurse turnover

  • To increase your awareness of the common leadership styles among nurse managers

  • To understand how nurse managers’ leadership styles can influence nurse retention

Background Predicting nurse turnover is important to prevent expensive and avoidable staff loss. One factor that may influence nurse turnover is nurse managers’ leadership styles. Three main leadership styles have been identified: transactional, in which leaders give contingent rewards; transformational, in which leaders inspire and motivate; and passive-avoidant, in which leaders are absent.

Aim To assess the effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover in Jordanian hospitals.

Method A descriptive, cross-sectional, and correlational study design was used. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ-5X) was used to assess nurses’ perceptions of their nurse managers’ leadership styles, while the Anticipated Turnover Scale was used to assess nurses’ intention to leave the job. The questionnaires were distributed to 280 nurses in three public sector hospitals and one university-affiliated (teaching) hospital in the north of Jordan.

Results Responses were received from 250 nurses working in a variety of clinical areas, yielding a response rate of 89%. The respondents perceived that the transactional leadership style was the most common among their nurse managers, followed by the transformational style and passive-avoidant style. It was also identified that, on average, respondents had a slight intention to leave their jobs. The transformational leadership style was found to reduce predicted nurse turnover, while the passive-avoidant and transactional leadership styles had no significant effect on this.

Conclusion Understanding the effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover may improve retention. Therefore, nurse managers should undertake training programmes on effective leadership to improve nurses’ job satisfaction and reduce turnover.

Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2020.e1928

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

mbarahemah@aabu.edu.jo

Conflict of interest

None declared

Suliman M, Almansi S, Mrayyan M et al (2020) Effect of nurse managers’ leadership styles on predicted nurse turnover. Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2020.e1928

Published online: 14 July 2020

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or