Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage in a region of NHS England
Evidence & Practice    

Enhancing nurse satisfaction: an exploration of specialty nurse shortage in a region of NHS England

Keith Gray Associate head of department, economics, finance and accounting, Coventry University, England
Rebecca Wilde Lecturer in economics, Coventry University, England
Karl Shutes Principal lecturer in finance, Coventry University, England

Aim This article offers nurse managers guidance on analysing, managing and addressing a potentially dissatisfied nursing workforce, focusing on three priority shortage specialties: emergency care, paediatrics and cardiology. The aim of the study was to explore to what extent registered nurses (RNs) and healthcare assistants (HCAs), referred to collectively here as ‘nursing staff’, are satisfied with teamworking opportunities, continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities and workplace autonomy.

Method A survey questionnaire was developed to evaluate three derived determinants of nurse satisfaction: team working, CPD and autonomy. The NHS West Midlands region was the focus given that it is among the poorest performing regions outside London in filling nursing posts.

Findings Overall, nursing staff respondents were satisfied with teamworking, CPD and autonomy, which challenges the perception that nurses in NHS England are dissatisfied with these satisfaction determinants. The findings give a complex picture of nurse satisfaction; for example a large minority of respondents were dissatisfied with their ability to carry out duties as they see fit.

Conclusion When developing management systems to investigate, manage and enhance nurse satisfaction, nurse managers must recognise the complexity and subtleties of determining factors. This will increase as nursing becomes more specialised. Subsequently, nurse managers need to work closely with staff at higher education institutions and other professional agencies to commission appropriate professional development.

Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2018.e1695

Correspondence

k.gray@coventry.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Acknowledgement

The authors wish to thank senior lecturer in adult nursing at Coventry University Laura Strumidlo for her helpful comments on the final draft of this paper.

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Received: 18 October 2017

Accepted: 13 February 2018

Published online: 20 March 2018