Parents’ experiences of hope following a child’s brain injury
Art & Science Previous     Next

Parents’ experiences of hope following a child’s brain injury

Liz Bray Lead nurse, placements and commissioning, Children’s Trust, Tadworth, Surrey

Professionals need to understand the difficulties families face following a childhood-acquired brain injury and help them maintain a sense of optimism, says Liz Bray

Aim To explore the lived experiences of parents caring for their child following a severe to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI).

Methods A Heideggerian phenomenological approach was used and the research set within the naturalistic paradigm. Eight parents were identified using purposive sampling. Each parent was interviewed on a one-to-one basis using semi-structured interviews. The interviews were typed up verbatim and the data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings Every parent acknowledged the need to maintain hope. The other themes identified were: the effects on the child post ABI, the need for accurate information, emotional support, effects on the family, fear of death, transition, family accommodation and funding.

Conclusion Following a childhood brain injury it is important that parents can maintain a sense of hope and receive emotional support and accurate information. Staff could use these research findings to increase their awareness and inform their own practice.

Nursing Children and Young People. 27, 7,22-26. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.27.7.22.e618

Correspondence

lbray@thechildrenstrust.org.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to open review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 09 February 2015

Accepted: 26 May 2015