Sickle cell anaemia and the experiences of young people living with the condition
evidence and practice    

Sickle cell anaemia and the experiences of young people living with the condition

Nicole Foster Staff nurse, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Gloucester, England
Michelle Ellis Senior lecturer in child health, School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, England

Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a life-threatening haemoglobin disorder acknowledged for its unpredictability and painful episodes. The aim of this qualitative literature review was to explore the experiences of young people living with SCA and its effect on their lives. The objective was to critically review selected primary research and make recommendations for practice, education and research. After reviewing potential articles using EBSCOhost, inclusion and exclusion criteria were devised and six appropriate studies were found with most participants in the 10-25 years age range. These studies were conducted in the UK and the United States. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme qualitative research checklist was used to evaluate the articles.

Thematic analysis identified three themes: acceptance, support and unpredictability, with sub-themes of spirituality and discrimination. It was clear that SCA affected multiple areas of young people’s lives. Recommendations are made for practice, education and research.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e935

Citation

Foster N, Ellis M (2018) Sickle cell anaemia and the experiences of young people living with the condition. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e935

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

m.ellis@city.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 26 April 2018

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