Early recognition and treatment of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children
evidence and practice    

Early recognition and treatment of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children

Ann Wilkinson Advanced nurse practitioner, Gresleydale Healthcare Centre, Derbyshire, England

Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is characterised by a non-blanching rash, which commonly affects the lower limbs of children aged 3-15 years. It is the most common vasculitis in children. HSP often develops after an upper respiratory tract infection and is more likely to present in autumn, winter and spring. The majority of cases resolve with symptomatic treatment although some cases may progress to serious complications, including renal involvement. A case study is presented and differential diagnoses are explored. The pathophysiology of HSP is discussed. Nurses are often the first to assess patients so they are in an ideal position to recognise and treat HSP early on. Admission of a child into hospital is a stressful event for the parents and child; the nurse can help by ensuring prompt admission to hospital and offering support and reassurance to the family.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2019.e1118

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

ann.wilkinson1@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

None declared

Wilkinson A (2019) Early recognition and treatment of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2019.e1118

Published online: 12 August 2019