A multisite evaluation of readiness to transition to newly qualified nurse in a cohort of children’s nursing students
evidence and practice    

A multisite evaluation of readiness to transition to newly qualified nurse in a cohort of children’s nursing students

Elizabeth Crighton Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health Social Care and Education, children’s nursing, Kingston University and St George’s University London
David Anderson Senior lecturer, City, University London
Deborah Martin Senior lecturer, University of Hertfordshire
Brian Richardson Senior lecturer, Middlesex University
Rachel M Taylor Senior research fellow, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Background The post-qualifying and preceptorship period in nursing has been well-researched, however, there is limited evidence about the immediate period before qualifying.

Aim To explore the experiences of role transition of London-based final placement (FP) children’s nursing students and to identify what support is required for future cohorts of students.

Method Four London universities circulated an online questionnaire to FP students. The questionnaire content included FP student experiences, preparation for role transition and employability.

Results Seventy seven students responded (27%). Twenty seven students (35%) felt well-prepared to transition. The main concerns included: becoming an accountable practitioner, employers’ expectations and availability of support in the newly qualified period. Students wanted more employability support and the opportunity to talk to newly qualified nurses and prospective employers.

Conclusion Universities and clinical partners need to do more to develop better education and support for FP students and deliver it in a timely way.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e1049

Citation

Crighton E, Anderson D, Martin D et al (2018) A multisite evaluation of readiness to transition to newly qualified nurse in a cohort of children’s nursing students. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2018.e1049

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

e.crighton@sgul.kingston.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to thank professor of children’s nursing at Kingston University and St George’s University London Jayne Price for her support and providing feedback on this draft manuscript

Published online: 15 June 2018

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