Neurological observations in infants, children and young people: part one
Intended for healthcare professionals
CPD    

Neurological observations in infants, children and young people: part one

Kelvin McMillan Assistant professor, Medical School, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England
Hannah Shaw Teaching fellow, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England
Alice Hemesley Paediatric intensive care staff nurse, Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, England
Waheeda Zaman Lecturer, Faculty of Health Education and Life Sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England
Nabisah Qazim Assistant lecturer, Faculty of Health Education and Life Sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your knowledge of the different types and causes of acquired brain injuries (ABIs) in infants, children and young people

  • To increase your understanding of the pathophysiology of ABIs and associated complications

  • To contribute towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

Caring for infants, children and young people with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can be challenging due to their developing brain and reliance on parents and caregivers. It is essential that children’s nurses are able to perform effective neurological observations, because these can identify deterioration and inform the management of patients with an ABI. This is the first of two articles that aim to encourage accuracy and consistency when undertaking neurological observations in infants, children and young people with an ABI to optimise their care. This first article details the pathophysiology, types and causes of ABIs and explains the potential complications that can occur following such injuries.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2023.e1472

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@CYP_UOB_Kelvin

Correspondence

k.mcmillan@bham.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

McMillan K, Shaw H, Hemesley A et al (2023) Neurological observations in infants, children and young people: part one. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2023.e1472

Published online: 03 July 2023

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