Biological basis of child health 13: structure and functions of the skin, and common children’s skin conditions
CPD    

Biological basis of child health 13: structure and functions of the skin, and common children’s skin conditions

Kate Davies Associate professor of paediatric prescribing and endocrinology, London South Bank University, and honorary research fellow in paediatric endocrinology, Queen Mary University of London, England
Catherine Hewitt Senior lecturer in children’s nursing, London South Bank University, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your knowledge of the structure and main functions of the skin

  • To understand the aetiology, manifestations and management of skin conditions commonly seen in children

  • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

This article, the 13th in a series on the biological basis of child health, focuses on the skin. The skin is the largest organ in the body and covers its whole outer surface, protecting it from external threats, assisting in retaining body fluids, eliminating waste products and regulating temperature. The skin also has a crucial role in wound healing and vitamin D synthesis. Skin conditions in children are often distressing for children and parents, and may significantly affect their everyday lives. This article explains how the skin develops in utero, describes the structure and functions of the skin, and explores the aetiology, manifestations and management of skin conditions commonly seen in children.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2021.e1359

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@sausmash

Correspondence

kate.davies@lsbu.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Davies K, Hewitt C (2021) Biological basis of child health 13: structure and functions of the skin, and common children’s skin conditions. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2021.e1359

Published online: 20 September 2021

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