Validity and reliability of the psychometric properties of a child abuse questionnaire
evidence and practice    

Validity and reliability of the psychometric properties of a child abuse questionnaire

June Patricia Colgrave PhD Candidate, Nursing, University of Sydney Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Helen Stasa Research Associate, University of Sydney Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Jennifer Fraser Associate Professor, University of Sydney Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Background Few valid and reliable measures of professional self-efficacy and its influence on reporting child abuse and neglect (CAN) are available.

Aim To test the psychometric properties of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Self-Efficacy (CANRSE) (English) questionnaire.

Discussion The Psychometric Grading Framework graded the strength of the psychometric properties of CANRSE (English) as ‘good’. CANRSE can be measured using this tool, having been tested with a cohort of Australian health professionals. CANRSE can be used in Australian healthcare settings and will benefit health disciplines by examining the influence of self-efficacy on CAN reporting in clinical practice and research.

Conclusion The psychometric properties of CANRSE (English) provide evidence to support the assertion that it is a reliable instrument to measure self-efficacy in reporting CAN cases.

Implications for practice The validity and reliability of CANRSE (English) have been established. Future research should focus on larger studies testing a shorter version of the tool.

Nurse Researcher. doi: 10.7748/nr.2020.e1677

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

june.colgrave@scu.edu.au

Conflict of interest

None declared

Colgrave J, Stasa H, Fraser J (2020) Validity and reliability of the psychometric properties of a child abuse questionnaire. Nurse Researcher. doi: 10.7748/nr.2020.e1677

Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank Northern NSW and Mid North Coast NSW local health districts for their support with this research. They also wish to thank the clinicians who completed the research questionnaire as well as the clinical nurse specialist, academics, ethics committee, and child abuse and neglect expert for their feedback and critique of CANRSE (English)

Published online: 13 February 2020

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Quaterly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or