Use of focus group data from countries with linguistic differences: translation, analysis and presentation
evidence and practice    

Use of focus group data from countries with linguistic differences: translation, analysis and presentation

Mamdooh Alzyood Doctoral Researcher, nursing, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England
Debra Jackson Professor of Nursing, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, New South Wales, Australia
Helen Aveyard Principal Lecturer for Student Experience, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England
Joanne Brooke Professor of Nursing, faculty of health, education and life sciences, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, England

Why you should read this article
  • To help with your plans to complete focus group discussions in countries with different linguistics

  • To enable you to manage data from countries with different linguistics in three main areas: translation, analysis and presentation

  • To assist you in the process of translation and analysis of qualitative data from countries with different linguistics

Background The use of focus groups to collect data has increased in nursing research and provides rich, in-depth understanding of a phenomenon that can inform clinical practice. Guidance has been developed on facilitating focus groups. However, there is little guidance about how to translate, analyse or present focus group data from countries with linguistic differences.

Aim To explore contemporary examples of translating, analysing and presenting focus group data from countries with linguistic differences and to provide an in-depth example of decision-making in a study involving focus group data from two countries.

Discussion The study highlights the need for a clear rationale and transparency in the reporting of the translation, analysis and presentation of data. Detailed and transparent reporting needs to include not only translation, but also when this occurred and if the data were amalgamated.

Conclusion There is a need for evidence-based guidance concerning how to report the translation, transcription and analysis of focus group data from countries with linguistic differences.

Implications for practice The authors provide recommendations concerning information that researchers should provide about translation when publishing studies, and argue for the use of a bilingual lead researcher.

Nurse Researcher. doi: 10.7748/nr.2020.e1679

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

mamdooh.alzyood-2015@brookes.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Alzyood M, Jackson D, Brooke J et al (2020) Use of focus group data from countries with linguistic differences: translation, analysis and presentation. Nurse Researcher. doi: 10.7748/nr.2020.e1679

Accepted 15 October 2019

Published online: 06 February 2020

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