The application and tailoring of Colaizzi’s phenomenological approach in a hospital setting
evidence and practice    

The application and tailoring of Colaizzi’s phenomenological approach in a hospital setting

Tiffany Northall Lecturer, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia
Esther Chang Professor, Aged and palliative care, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia
Deborah Hatcher Dean, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia
Daniel Nicholls Lecturer, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia

Background Husserl’s descriptive phenomenology is a popular methodology in health research as it provides a way to understand people’s experiences. Positioned in Husserl’s phenomenology, Colaizzi’s approach offers a way to analyse data and develop trustworthy findings. However, it can pose methodological and practical challenges.

Aim To present a discussion of the application and tailoring of Colaizzi’s phenomenological approach to a study conducted in a hospital.

Discussion Applying Colaizzi’s approach to interview data concerning health professionals’ decisions about transferring older people in hospital to residential care provided a decision trail. However, Colaizzi’s final step – member-checking – is controversial so was tailored to enhance the development of trustworthy findings.

Conclusion Validating findings is an important part of conducting research. Tailoring the final step of member-checking in Colaizzi’s approach supports trustworthy findings while staying connected to phenomenological epistemology.

Implications for practice Phenomenology is a popular methodology for nurse researchers. Tailoring Colaizzi’s approach provides strategies to augment phenomenological methods, ensuring dependable findings. Nurse researchers conducting phenomenological research can use these strategies.

Nurse Researcher. 28, 2, 20-25. doi: 10.7748/nr.2020.e1700

Correspondence

t.northall@westernsydney.edu.au

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

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