Reflections on a yearly camp at an adult mental health rehabilitation unit
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Reflections on a yearly camp at an adult mental health rehabilitation unit

Emma Dorn Occupational therapist, North Western Mental Health, Coburg, Victoria, Australia
Danielle Hitch Academic occupational therapy project officer, North Western Mental Health, Coburg, Victoria, Australia

This article describes the implementation and evaluation of an annual camp at a secure unit in Australia. The Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit is a locked medium secure unit housing clients with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder with severe and treatment resistant symptoms. For the past 6 years, the unit has been offering an annual 3-day camp as a means of supporting recovery and enhancing occupational participation. Principals aligned with the Australian national framework for recovery-orientated mental health services are used to reflect on the implementation of this camp, including its benefits and challenges. Feedback received from clients is very positive overall, with many stating they were treated with respect and would attend another camp if given the chance. Providing this opportunity for clients has involved a combination of careful risk assessment and management with positive risk taking. However, this challenge continues to pay off through improved relationships between staff and clients, and support of clinical and personal recovery.

Mental Health Practice. 19, 10, 33-37. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2016.e1113

Correspondence

Danielle.Hitch@mh.org.au

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 11 August 2015

Accepted: 03 December 2015