The ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice: a pilot study in an acute mental health setting
evidence and practice    

The ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice: a pilot study in an acute mental health setting

Rawle Ragoobar (joint first author) Deputy Trust Lead Staff Support Team, registered mental health nurse, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Robert Turton (joint first author) Assistant Psychologist, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Helen Winter Staff Support Lead, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Nicola Power Head of Art Therapies, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Catherine Belton Staff Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Claudia Chow Assistant Psychologist, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Alison Beck Head of Psychology and Psychotherapy, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your awareness of the challenges that mental health professionals commonly experience, and the support they require

  • To gain knowledge of the ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice and its components

  • To understand the potential benefits of shift reflection for staff working in acute mental health settings

Background ‘Shift reflection’ is a novel, structured method of group reflective practice at the end of a shift. It involves a facilitator asking open questions about the shift, then using a mapping process to draw and make connections between the experiences of staff.

Aim To undertake a pilot study of shift reflection in an acute mental health unit and to gather feedback from staff and service users on its effect on staff well-being, teamwork and ward culture.

Method A mixed-methods design was used. Staff members provided feedback using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale, completed pre-pilot (n=10) and post-pilot (n=14), a staff feedback questionnaire (n=14) and a focus group (n=7). Data from the questionnaires were examined using descriptive statistics and effect sizes, while the focus group data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings The preliminary findings suggest that shift reflection was effective in supporting staff and that it improved team cohesion and morale. The ProQOL scale results indicated a small increase in compassion satisfaction, a medium reduction in secondary traumatic stress and a large reduction in burnout scores post-pilot. Five themes emerged from the focus group: value of shift reflection; team benefits; supportive role of facilitation; implementation challenges; and future directions.

Conclusion While several challenges in implementing shift reflection were identified, the findings of this pilot study provide a foundation for developing and testing its effectiveness in future research.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2020.e1452

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

rawle.ragoobar@slam.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Ragoobar R, Turton R, Winter H et al (2020) The ‘shift reflection’ model of group reflective practice: a pilot study in an acute mental health setting. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2020.e1452

Published online: 31 March 2020

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