The practice of seclusion: a review of the discourse on its use
evidence and practice    

The practice of seclusion: a review of the discourse on its use

Pras Ramluggun Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, England
Charlotte Chalmers Staff nurse, East London NHS Foundation Trust, England
Mahmood Anjoyeb Senior lecturer in mental health, Buckinghamshire New University, England

Seclusion is an intervention used as a safety measure to manage patients who are violent, show disturbed behaviour and who pose a risk of harm to others (Department of Health 2015). However, it is perceived as a contentious practice and, with the move towards treating people with mental health issues in the least restrictive environment, it has received much criticism. Consequently, there has been considerable debate about its therapeutic value and a call for it to be phased out. This article outlines the purpose of seclusion, and examines evidence on its use in adult mental health settings and its effect on nurses and patients, with emphasis on the interpersonal nature of nursing care during this intervention.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1258

Citation

Ramluggun P, Chalmers C, Anjoyeb M (2018) The practice of seclusion: a review of the discourse on its use. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1258

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

pramluggun@brookes.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 25 April 2018

You need a subscription to read the full article