Male adolescent suicidality: a literature review
evidence and practice    

Male adolescent suicidality: a literature review

Amy Conroy Nursing student, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King’s College London, England
Tommy Dickinson Senior lecturer in mental health and deputy head of the department of mental health, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King’s College London, Talbott visiting professor of nursing, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, US

In the UK, suicide rates in adolescent males continue to rank consistently and significantly higher than in females. Despite this, suicide prevention strategies within government policies, clinical guidance and practice, appear to lack gender specific guidance. Evidence suggests that social constructions of masculinity can influence various factors that contribute to suicidality in this high-risk group. This article reports the results of a literature review, which aimed to inform the development of gender specific guidelines for mental health services to assist in preventing suicidality in adolescent males.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1293

Citation

Conroy A, Dickinson T (2018) Male adolescent suicidality: a literature review. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1293

Correspondence

tommy.dickinson@kcl.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 28 June 2018

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