Attitudes of dual diagnosis service users to mobile apps that aid treatment adherence
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Attitudes of dual diagnosis service users to mobile apps that aid treatment adherence

John Harrison Senior lecturer in mental health nursing, School of Nursing and Allied Health, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, England
May Baker Senior lecturer in mental health nursing, School of Nursing and Allied Health, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, England

Aims To examine the response of dual diagnosis service users towards the development of a mobile phone application (app) that would assist with treatment adherence.

Method An exploratory focus group study was used with purposive sampling to recruit those taking part in each group (n=8 and 9). Each group’s recorded data were analysed using a process developed by Graneheim and Lundman (2004) and Evans and Whitcombe (2016).

Findings Data analysis led to the emergence of three themes:

Support for the app.

Supportive with recommendations about its contents.

Negative responses that questioned the applicability of the app for dual diagnosis service users.

Conclusion While the development of mobile phone apps has enhanced healthcare delivery, more research is needed into their use with specific client groups, such as those with a dual diagnosis. Such groups require a bespoke approach and their needs and expectations need to be examined in detail with input from service users. This may lend more relevance to the app, which in turn will encourage the user to use it in their treatment and recovery.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1324

Citation

Harrison J, Baker M (2018) Attitudes of dual diagnosis service users to mobile apps that aid treatment adherence. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2018.e1324

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

J.C.Harrison@ljmu.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the service users who formed the respondent group and the clinicians who assisted for kindly giving their time

Published online: 16 October 2018

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