The impact of intellectual impairment on the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy
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The impact of intellectual impairment on the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy

Ann Madden Nurse lecturer, Queen’s University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Belfast
Jackie Parkes Senior lecturer, Queen’s University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Belfast

Nurses are pivotal to ensuring children with a learning disability and cerebral palsy lead the best life they can, say Ann Madden and Jackie Parkes

Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood and half of these children will have an intellectual impairment. This article reports on the quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and explores the impact of intellectual impairment. Learning disability nurses have a critical role to play in improving the quality of life for this patient group, particularly in relation to their physical health and creating opportunities to promote social skill development and social inclusion.

Learning Disability Practice. 13, 10,28-33. doi: 10.7748/ldp2010.12.13.10.28.c8140

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