Taking your time: mindfulness for learning disability nursing students
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Taking your time: mindfulness for learning disability nursing students

Amy Hutchison Visiting lecturer, School of Nursing Midwifery and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh
Tracy Cunningham Staff nurse, Loch View inpatients services, NHS Forth Valley
Annie Millar Community learning disability nurse, West Lothian Community Team, NHS Lothian
Caryn McWhirter Staff nurse, Islay Centre, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, NHS Lothian
Linda Hume Lecturer, School of Nursing Midwifery and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh
Martin Gaughan Former lecturer, School of Nursing Midwifery and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University

Mindfulness is used increasingly by nurses to help people with a learning disability – and their carers – to manage difficult emotions or situations. It is important, therefore, that nursing students are familiar with this technique. This article, written collaboratively by third-year learning disability nursing students and lecturers, describes a bespoke workshop that introduced the concept of mindfulness in nursing practice. It also gives a brief history of mindfulness, and considers the effect that practising mindfulness could have on nurses and the people they care for. The article concludes with some suggestions of areas for research.

Learning Disability Practice. 19, 6, 26-30. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2016.e733

Correspondence

m.gaughan@napier.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 21 January 2016

Accepted: 18 May 2016